HOW DO I IMMIGRATE TO CANADA AS A WORKER?

 

Canada is one of the most requested countries in terms of immigration, for several reasons: high-quality education, universal health, employment opportunities, cultural and religious diversity… 

As a worker and depending on your current situation, you have different opportunities to immigrate to Canada.[1]
Thus, in this article, we will come back point by point on the different opportunities that are available to you as a worker.[2]

We will first study immigration programs at the federal level, namely Express Entry, the program dedicated to the self-employed and the start-up visa program. These programs will allow you to immigrate to all provinces except Quebec (I).

Next, we will discuss the programs created for young people, namely the Working Holiday Permit and the Young Professionals Permit, which make it easier than other programs to immigrate from anywhere in Canada, including Quebec (II).

Finally, the programs specific to the province of Quebec, namely the Quebec program for permanent workers, temporary workers and business people (III), will be apprehended.

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IMPATRIATION OR WHEN A FRENCH CITIZEN GOES BACK TO FRANCE

Impatriation is a tax regime that was created for the benefit of French citizens who are tax residents abroad and also called “expats” who want to return to France permanently. 

This status aims to encourage French citizens to return to live in France after their expatriation.

Thus, an impatriate will be able to avoid paying French taxes when returning to France by benefiting from an exemption on certain sources of French and foreign income.

In this article, we will go over this impatriation regime point by point.

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FOCUS ON THE TAX CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE & U.A.E; THE EMIRATES – ITS IMPACTS FOR INDIVIDUALS RESIDENT IN THE U.A.E

The taxation agreement between the French government and the Government of the United Arab Emirates was signed on July 19, 1989 and was amended in 1993 to include today also a multilateral treaty to prevent base erosion since the entry into force on January1, 2019 (the “Convention”).  

The objectives of this Convention are multiple. 

Firstly, both countries wish to promote their economic relations and cooperation in tax matters. 

In addition, they wish to eliminate double taxation in respect of certain taxes specifically covered by the Convention[1].

However, the Convention has provided a caveat: the arrangements or strategies put in place by taxpayers, whether natural or legal persons, must not have the sole purpose of obtaining tax relief under the Convention.

The French and Emirati taxes concerned by the Convention are limited to [2]:

  • income tax, including in the case of a sale of a real estate property;
  • tax on companies registered in France or in the U.A.E;
  • the solidarity tax on real estate wealth; and
  • inheritance tax.
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CANADA – COVID-19 – New policy exempting some foreigners without migration status still in Canada from immigration requirements

The process put in place by the government is very recent since it was put in place on 14 July 2020 and will remain in force until 31 December 2020.

It is extremely interesting for foreigners still in Canada because it facilitates almost all the steps that affect them.

We will return point by point to this new government policy and these conditions.

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COVID 19 & French immigration law

The emergency law to deal with the coronavirus epidemic has been enacted on 23 March 2020 and an update of this law has been adopted by the “Assemblée Nationale” on June 3 (it must be adopted by the “Sénat” as well before being enacted).

The law includes a section that concerns immigration law.

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